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Turkey Creek Lane · Moist

Moist

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The People’s Exchange is an “advertising paper” serving the Amish communities in Northern Indiana and Southern Michigan. It has a circulation of 10,500. It’s printed every two weeks. And, it is FREE. 

In The People’s Exchange you can find a “Charming Spinner” to get your clothes “50 to 90% dry” or a “woman safe” driving horse. There are ads for “certified organic” Jersey cattle, for race ponies and for farms. Every issue also contains a “favorite” sent-in-by-reader recipe.

Last week they had  the best tasting cake recipe ever. It came out light, fluffy and moist with a wonderful sugary crust. Yummmmmmm…

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Last week, The Peoples Exchange had 136 pages.

AMISH POUND CAKE

1 box yellow cake mix (2 layer box)

4 eggs

8 oz. cream cheese

1/2 cup milk

1 pkg.instant vanilla pudding (The recipe didn’t say which size. I used the small box)

brown sugar

cinnamon

Mix together the cake mix, eggs, cream cheese milk and pudding. Pour batter into 2 loaf pans and top with brown sugar and cinnamon. (I was pretty generous.)

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Yes, the recipe does use mixes. But, you end up with a cake, fresh from your oven, that TASTES made-from-scratch.dsc01927.JPG
I wish I had some just “picked-from-the-garden” strawberries.

SUBSCRIPTION FORM FOR

    THE PEOPLE’S EXCHANGE

(courtesy of The People’s Exchange)

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The sun is setting. It’s time to eat!

According to my husband, beef pot pie is one of the best things I make. It is also easy.

The two essentials to making meat pie are first to have enough good & tasty gravy to almost cover the cooked meat, and second to ensure that steam does not produce a soggy crust.

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My dough is rolled out and ready to go over the gravy-covered beef and vegetables.

Here are two sure-fire methods to prevent a soggy pie crust (I use method 2):

  1. Use any unsweetened pie dough and prebake separately on a baking tin cut to cover the casserole. Since pie dough shrinks during baking cut it slightly larger than your baking dish and prick it with a fork. Bake the pastry seperately at 425 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown. Set your crust aside. Cover your meat and gravy (vegetables too, if desired) with aluminum foil and bake until warm in the casserole dish. When your meat and gravy is hot and bubbly, place the prebaked crust on top and serve at once.
  2. OR… put an unbaked dough over the stew and bake the meat mixture and dough at the same time (I prefer this method):

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Fill baking dish with cooked stew and gravy to one inch from the top. Place over it a generous covering of round of dough, allowing for shrinking. Brush dough with a little milk. Be sure to make slashes and prick your dough with a fork to allow steam to escape. Bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes.  Cover pie crust edges with foil. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake for 35 minutes until crust is golden and your filling is bubbly.

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Buster begging for pie trimmings. He’s already had some. See the flour on his face?

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The pot pie is hot and ready. For my filling I used left-over roast beef & gravy, cooked mixed vegetables (frozen mix) and another cup of gravy made from a dried mix.

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Yea! My crust is flakey, not soggy.

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