Fruit

You are currently browsing the archive for the Fruit category.

dsc00638.JPG
Our neighborhood grocery has hitching posts and shelter for horses.

This is one of my favorite recipes. Perfect for special holidays, it looks and tastes wonderful. It is easy to make too.

I have also included my pie crust recipe.

dsc00693.JPG
My, oh my…this pie is SO GOOD!

Amish Sour Cream Apple Pie with Brown Sugar Topping

FILLING:

Mix:

2/3 cup sugar

2 tblsp. flour

1/4 tsp salt

ADD:

1 cup sour cream

1 tsp. vanilla

1 egg

Stir in 3 cups of apples. If apples are not tart add 1 1/2 tsp. lemon juice to apples before adding them to the sour cream mixture.

Put filling into unbaked pie and bake at 400 degrees for 25 minutes.

Remove pie from oven and sprinkle with Brown Sugar Crumb topping. Bake for an additional 20 more minutes.

BROWN SUGAR CRUMB TOPPING

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/3 cup flour

1/4 cup butter (room temperature)

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

Mix together all ingredients until they become course and crumbly.

COOL PIE FOR AN HOUR BEFORE SERVING.

dsc00687.JPG
Be sure to cool for an hour before serving.

PERFECT PIE CRUST

Mix together

2 cups all-purpose flour (I use Gold Meadow)

1 tsp salt

dsc00683.JPG
Cut butter and shortening into flour mixture with a fork until it is cumbly. Don’t worry about overmixing at this stage.

 Cut in with fork :

 2/3 cup chilled lard or shortening (I use Crisco)

2 tbsp. chilled butter

Sprinkle dough with:

4 tbsp. water

Blend the water lightly into the dough. You may lift the ingredients with a fork, allowing the moisture to hold the ingredients together. You may add up to 1 more tablespoon of water if needed.

Gather the dough up  into two balls. Chill until ready to roll out.

dsc00685.JPG
Once you have sprinkled your dough with water, mix and handle the dough as little as possible. This crust has been rolled out and is ready to be crimped.

STILL LOOKING FOR APPLE RECIPES? The Rocky Road of Love has an Apple Cake said to be so rich, moist and full of tangy apples you can have it for breakfast, the next day: http://rockyroadoflove.wordpress.com/2007/09/28/fresh-apple-cake/#comment-939

holidaycooking.jpg

Looking for Holiday Recipes? Be sure to visit Overwhelmed With Joy’s 2nd Edition of, “Holiday Cooking, Blogger Style”  at:

http://overwhelmedwithjoy.blogspot.com/

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

blog-pictures-5-025.jpg
The pear crisp is warm from the oven and ready to serve.

This dessert features a wonderful, butter pecan crisp topping over fresh pears in an Old South flavored brown sugar, cream cheese sauce. It is best warm from the oven and topped with good vanilla ice cream or a whipped topping.

 INGREDIENTS

2 tbsp. cream cheese (softened to room temperature)

2 tbsp. brown sugar

1/4 tsp. cinnamon

pinch of salt

2 large pears, peeled, cored and cut in chunks

2 tbsp. chopped pecans

8 crushed vanilla wafers

2 tbsp. butter

vanilla ice cream or whipped topping

 DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 350. Butter small casserole dish. Mix sugar, softened cream cheese, cinnamon and salt until well blended. Stir in pears and pour mixture into buttered casserole.

Mix pecans, wafers and butter in another bowl. Sprinkle over cream cheese with pear mixture. Bake 30 minutes or until pears are bubbling and crispy topping is golden brown.

Serve with ice cream or whipped topping.

Makes 4 small or 2 very large servings.

dsc00407.jpg
Getting the ingredients together.

dsc00410.jpg
A zip lock bag makes crushing crumbs and cleaning up a breeze.

ANOTHER VERSION: Ellaella of  made this dessert with some Yankee touches. One of the changes she made was to substitute gingersnaps for the vanilla wafers. She also made individual servings instead of using one casserole dish. AND …according to Ellaella the crisp was outstanding. You can find Ellaella’s version here: http://foodpluspolitics.com/

Tags: , , , , , , ,

peach-pie.jpg
 According to my husband this was the best peach pie, ever.

I made changes in the recipe because the peaches were so juicy. I also wanted my top crust to stay crispy. So, I mixed 2 tablespoons of flour with 1/4 cup of sugar. I put the sugar/flour mixture over the filling before dotting with butter and adding the top crust. (Don’t worry the top mixture of sugar and flour will cook into the pie. And, it will keep your top crust from becoming soggy.)

PEACH PIE FILLING:

 5 to 6 cups of peaches

1/2 to 2/3 cup white or brown sugar (I used 2/3 cup of white)

1/8 tsp. salt

1 1/2 tsp. cornstarch

1/4 tsp. cinnamon

1/8 tsp. nutmeg

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Dot with 1 1/2 tablespoons of butter

DIRECTIONS: Bake the pie in a preheated 450 degree oven for 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350 degrees and bake 35 to 40 minutes or until golden brown. The middle should be bubbling.

dsc00223.jpg How to peel peaches: dip the fruit in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds. Remove from the water using a slotted spoon and put into a large bowl or pot of cold water and ice. The skins will easily slide off.

Healingmagichands of  http://healingmagichands.wordpress.com/, kindly added it is important to make sure the peaches are ripe before peeling. Otherwise the peels may not slip off.

Thanks for your help, Healingmagichands!

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

dsc00221.jpg
Peaches ripening in a sunny window.

After a couple of days in a sunny window the peaches, saved from the beetles, were ripe and ready. I had enough to make a peach cobbler and a peach pie, plus some for the freezer. 

I love peach pies, crisps and cobblers, BUT with freshly ripened organic ones, this dessert is one of my favorites. Especially topped with vanilla ice cream.

dsc00224.jpg Getting ready to make peach cobbler.

SOUTHERN PEACH COBBLER FOR TWO

(Can be doubled)

FILLING:

2 cups peaches

1/2 tsp. lemon juice

2 tablespoons brown sugar

1 tsp. cornstarch

TOPPING:

1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons flour

2 tsp. sugar

1/4 tsp. baking powder

Pinch of salt

Pinch of cinnamon

Pinch of nutmeg

1 tablespoon butter cut into pieces

2 tablespoons whipping cream

dsc00227.jpg DIRECTIONS:

Grease small casserole dish with butter. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Peel & cut up peaches. Mix peaches and lemon juice. Mix cornstarch, brown sugar and cinnamon with peaches and put peaches into greased casserole dish.

 In another bowl, mix flour, sugar, baking powder, salt. cinnamon and nutmeg. Cut in butter until mixture is crumbly. Add the cream and toss with flour mixture just until the dough is combined.

 Turn the dough out onto a flour surface and knead a few times to smooth it. Then roll it out into the shape of the casserole dish. Place the dough over the filling and sprinkle with 1/4 tsp. of sugar. Bake until the top is golden and the juices are bubbling. 25 to 30 minutes.

peach_cobbler.jpg
 The cobbler is ready to eat.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

dsc00178.jpg
Our peach tree is heavy with fruit. DH planted it 7 years ago.

We had peaches!

Bad frosts and windstorms had taken our peaches before they reached marble size in previous years.  But, this year we had peaches turning golden, pink and red.  I dreamed of peach jams, cobblers, pies and crisps.  

I started checking the fruit daily, feeling peaches to see if they had softened. As the summer days lengthened, our tree, heavily laden with fruit, became as gorgeous and fragrant as any flower. 

I swear, I could smell the peaches ripening. Evidently so can Japanese Beetles.

 Yesterday disaster struck.

dsc00209.jpg Japanese Beetles devouring a “ripe” peach. 

Some peaches were ripe

BUT, every “ripe” peach was swarming with  and being devoured by Japanese beetles. Only the ripe peaches, mind you. The hard peaches, they left alone

DH and I grabbed ladders and sacks and began picking. We picked every peach we could. After soaking them to get rid of any insects I set them out on my counter as recommended here: http://tonytantillo.com/fruits/peaches.html

Some food experts recommend putting peaches into a paper bag to ripen. Others swear that the only way to have good ripe peaches is to only pick them at the moment of peak ripeness.

Mine were ready to eat after only a couple of days on the counter.

dsc00214.jpg
Soaking the peaches to get rid of any remaining insects.

How to tell if peaches are ripe:

Attached to the tree: Peaches are best picked when the fruit separates easily from the twigs. If it is hard to pull off the tree, it isn’t ripe!

Color: Green is definitely unripe, but you can’t use red color as an indicator of how ripe a peach is. Different peach varieties have differing amounts of red blush in their natural coloring. Pick them when the ground color changes from green to yellow, orange, red (or a combination). The skin of yellow-fleshed varieties ripens to an orange tint, while the skin of white-fleshed varieties changes from greenish- to yellow-white.

Softness: Unless you like your peaches very firm, pick your peaches with just a little “give” when gently pressed. Peaches at this stage are great for eating, freezing, and baking. Peaches won’t ripen very much after picking!  

Odor: The peaches should smell sweet and ripe

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

dot-with-butter1.jpg
My raspberry pie is dotted with butter and ready for the top crust.

It was a bit tart.

The next time I make this I will add more sugar. But still, two people ate the whole pie in two days.

amish-sign2.jpg
Mrs. Weaver’s Produce Stand

I live in Amish country…entrepreneurial Amish country. My neighbors sell eggs, vegetables, fruit, quilts, vitamins, bread, home baked food, dried noodles, handmade furniture and flowers from their homes.

Saturday, Mrs. Weaver had one pint of red raspberries. I had already gathered two cups of black raspberries from the wild bushes in our woods. With the red raspberries from the vegetable stand I had enough berries for pie.

dsc00163.jpg Red & Black Raspberry Pie

4 cups fresh berries

1 cup or more sugar (you will need more)

¼ cup flour

2 teaspoons tapioca

1 tablespoon lemon juice

pinch of salt

2 tablespoons butter

Mix all of the ingredients except for the berries & butter.

Sprinkle sugar and flour mixture over berries and stir gently. Let stand for 15 minutes. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Turn the fruit into a pie shell. Dot with butter. Cover the pie with top crust. Prick holes and design in crust. Bake the pie at 450 for 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350. Bake an additional 35 to 40 minutes or until the pie is golden brown.

raccoon-in-a-tree.jpg 

Raccoon in the mulberry tree…

Our mulberry trees are loaded. Not only with the purple, juicy fruit, but also with songbirds and raccoons. But, even with the wildlife gorging themselves, we still have mulberries by the ton. 

It seemed to me that mulberries could be substituted for other berries in pies and desserts, so I started experimenting. This is what I came up with. I would increase the flour a little next time as it was a little runny. But, other than that, it was very good.

I would definitely make it again.

Mulberry Pie

INGREDIENTS

4 cups mulberries

3/4 cups white sugar

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

1 recipe pastry for a 9 inch double crust pie

2 tablespoons butter

1 tablespoon milk

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a large bowl, mix berries with sugar and flour. Place mixture into bottom pie crust. Dot with butter and then cover with top pie crust. Crimp edges, cut slits in upper crust, and brush with milk. Sprinkle crust with a little sugar and cinnamon. Let pie rest in refrigerator for 30 minutes. Bake pie in preheated oven for 15 minutes. Lower oven temperature to 350 degrees and bake for an additional 30 minutes. Remove pie from oven and let sit on wire rack until cool.

Serve with ice cream.

I couldn’t believe what DH was asking me to do.

We were touring 38-room Oliver Mansion, Copshalom, (http://www.memoriesinmotion.net/south_bend.htm).  And, as we were being shown the gardens, DH had picked seeds from a tree. Then he wanted me to stuff them in my purse. Right in front of everyone.

“Nooooo…..they aren’t going to grow, anyway. You can’t start trees from seeds,” I whispered, giving DH “the look“.

Only one of them did.autumns-visit-006.jpg
These days, Quince trees are few and far between. Before touring the Oliver mansion, I had never heard of a Quince tree.

However, the seed that I had grudgingly put in my purse, the same seed DH carefully planted and nurtured, is thriving.

As it ages our Quince tree will develop a bark similar to that of some crepe myrtle trees. Its fruit will be knobby, mottled, hard and bitter, but so fragrant that in ancient times the fruit was used to perfume rooms, much as we use air fresheners today. It is easily transformed into excellent jams, jellies and preserves.

More about Quince trees: http://msucares.com/lawn/garden/msgardens/02/021202.html